What To Do If You're Pulled Over With a Friend Who Has Drugs

Young people in New Jersey need to be aware of whom they are driving with on the way home from parties or events, since being in the same car as an individual who is in possession of a controlled substance could lead to serious legal repercussions.

According to Alan Peyrouton, a criminal defense lawyer in Union City, NJ, young people in high school and college routinely get caught up in difficult legal situations that could have been avoided if they had taken more caution before getting into a car with other people.

At the Law Office of Alan Peyrouton in Union City, NJ, Peyrouton is a criminal defense lawyer who is frequently hired to represent teenagers who were charged with crimes because they were caught riding in the same vehicle as a person with contraband. In New Jersey, police may arrest anyone who is in a vehicle with another person who is in possession of a C.D.S. – also known as a controlled dangerous substance.

What does this mean for teenagers and other young people? As Peyrouton explains, a teenager who accepts a ride from a group of people he barely knows – or someone who offers a ride to an acquaintance who he is not very familiar with – could be arrested and charged with a crime if the vehicle he is in is pulled over and one or more of the passengers is found to be in possession of a controlled dangerous substance. For example, if NJ police officer has probable cause to stop a vehicle and subsequently searches the vehicle, there is a strong likelihood that every single person in the vehicle could be held responsible if a single person is found with marijuana.

One particular case that Peyrouton came across first hand as a criminal defense lawyer in Union City, NJ, was a situation in which a teenager gave a friend of his a ride home from a party, and the vehicle they were in ended up getting pulled over. When police searched the vehicle, they found 52 grams of marijuana stuffed inside a guitar that a passenger had put in the car. The driver of the vehicle was arrested and indicted for carrying more than 50 grams of marijuana, even though he had no clue that the controlled dangerous substance was in his car to begin with.

As a criminal defense lawyer in Union City, NJ, Peyrouton says this is the type of scenario that teens could easily avoid by not offering rides to people they barely know. He advises all of his clients to watch who they get into cars with, and to avoid offering people rides home from parties unless they know them very well.

Prevention is better than a cure. It takes courage to tell an acquaintance at a party that he or she cannot have a ride home, but Peyrouton says that type of courage is oftentimes necessarily for teenagers who want to maintain a clean legal record.

This article is for informational purposes only.  You should not rely on this article as a legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances, and you should not act upon this information without seeking professional counsel.  Publication of this article and your receipt of this article does not create an attorney-client relationship.

*Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. You should not rely on this article as a legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances, and you should not act upon this information without seeking professional counsel. Publication of this article and your receipt of this article does not create an attorney-client relationship.

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